Budget cuts result in Pierce students co-enrolling in other colleges

 

Joanna Zlatanov Poses with her two Student ID cards outside of Pierce College. Due to budget cuts Zlatanov had to enroll at Moorpark College in order to take the core classes that were unavailable to her at Pierce College. Photo: Jose Romero
Joanna Zlatanov Poses with her two Student ID cards outside of Pierce College. Due to budget cuts Zlatanov had to enroll at Moorpark College in order to take the core classes that were unavailable to her at Pierce College. Photo: Jose Romero

 

 

The statewide co-enrollment issue has become more noticeable as more than 15 percent of Pierce College students have enrolled in other community colleges as well as Pierce for the fall semester in order to complete the required classes and transfer to a four-year university.

 

As budgets were cut and classes were cancelled, more than 2,500 Pierce College students were left no choice but to co-enroll and begin attending other colleges as well as Pierce, according to Pierce College’s Dean of Research Carol Kozeracki.

 

The $400 million decrease in the California Community Colleges (CCC) budget will keep approximately 200,000 students from classes during this semester, according to California’s 2011-2012 state budget.

 

The Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) has lost $24 million due to these cuts.

 

Although Moorpark Community College is 20 minutes farther away from her home than Pierce College, Orr Moshe chooses to attend both schools this semester.

 

“It’s a longer drive,” she said. “But it’s worth it if I’m able to get the classes I need.”

 

Although Moorpark is a common choice amongst Pierce students, more than 12 precent of Pierce students who chose to enroll in other colleges selected a college within the LACCD, according to Kozeracki.

 

“I have to go to Moorpark if I want to take all the classes I need anytime soon,” said Joanna Zlatanov, another Pierce student who began to attend Moorpark after learning that all of the core classes at Pierce were full.

 

The 2011-2012 Caifornia Budget states that, if by Dec. 15, state revenues fall more than $1 billion below projections, the CCC budget will be cut by an additional $30 million.

 

In addition, if the shortfall is more than $2 billion, the community colleges will suffer a $102 million cut, causing more students to be forced to co-enroll and struggle in their pursue of education.

 

During her first year at Pierce, Moshe took all of the required courses she could, but was never able to enroll in English or math courses.

 

“It’s come to a point where I’m only taking one class at Pierce this semester,” Moshe said.