Too many withdraws mean no classes

The Board of Governors (BOG) passed new regulations, limiting community college students to no more than three chances to pass the same for credit class, be it in case of withdrawal (“W”) or a non-passing grade.

Prior to these changes, students were only affected by non-passing grades (D’s and Fails,) and though colleges are not expected to adopt this policy until the summer of 2012, even past “W’s” count against students and their limit of three attempts at any for credit course.

The amendment to these Title 5 regulations, passed July 2010, in response to the reduction in classes and increase in enrollment, according to a letter from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO).

“I don’t think it’s fair that W’s from your past should affect your current academic career,” said Shane Mooney, Associated Student Organization (ASO) Senator.  “I have two W’s from 2004 and they’re going to mess me up now?”

If a student drops a class within the first few weeks of the semester a “W” is not recorded. Any time after that, a “W” will be recorded, and if students wait until the end of the semester dropping a class will result in a fail.

“The goal of it is to get students to take their classes more seriously.” said Career and Transfer Center Director, Joanna Zimring Towne. “The fourth time they have to either appeal or take it outside of the district.”

 

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Written by Calvin Alagot

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