Over 500 students attend “Meet Your Major” event

Alejandra Mendez (right) stops by the Carreer and Transfer table and receives some information from Counseling Intern Hasina Mohammad (left).Photo: Carlos Carpio

Janit lopez (left) and Misael Balderas (center) speak with Xocoyotziu Herrera about Chicano Studies during Meet Your Major Day in the Great Hall at Pierce College on Wed. Oct. 10, 2012.Photo: Carlos Carpio

 

Alejandra Mendez (right) stops by the Carreer and Transfer table and receives some information from Counseling Intern Hasina Mohammad (left).Photo: Carlos Carpio

 

“Meet your Major,” sponsored by the Career and Transfer Center at Pierce College, took place in The Great Hall on Oct. 10, 2012.

 

The purpose of this event was to help students figure out their paths of success consisting of either an associate degree or certificate at Pierce or transferring to a four-year college to obtain a bachelors degree.

 

For the majority of incoming college students, whether going to a two or four-year school, have no idea what they want to do when they first start out, and with all the classes and majors out there it can be quite confusing.

 

“Approximately 50-70% of students are undeclared majors when initially registering for classes.” Director of Career Services Joanna Zimring-Towne said. “Students don’t know what they want to do, and it is very common.”

 

More than 500 interested and eager students filled The Great Hall to figure out the classes they need to get to the major they want.

 

The average person can change their careers seven times throughout their lives to figure out what they really want to do, according to Zimring-Towne

 

Jessica Saldivar, 20, an undeclared major, heard about today’s workshop from her criminal justice teacher.

 

“I had no idea what to expect,” Saldivar said. “But I am so glad I went to it.”

 

Saldivar, a Reseda High School graduate, attended this workshop for her first time at Pierce and was happy with today’s outcome by learning about the details of the major she was passionate about.

 

With an interest in history, she asked herself what she could do with a job in that field.

Janit lopez (left) and Misael Balderas (center) speak with Xocoyotziu Herrera about Chicano Studies during Meet Your Major Day in the Great Hall at Pierce College on Wed. Oct. 10, 2012.Photo: Carlos Carpio

 

 

“The teachers in each major narrow it down for you,” Salvidar explained. “For example, by showing how a history class can evolve into a major such as teaching, politics or law.”

 

Some students begin college by already having an idea of their major and what they want to do with it.

 

Erik Cohen, 19, psychology major, decided on Pierce first because of the cost.

 

“I was really glad to have attended this workshop,” Cohen said. “I felt this was a very basic introduction to meeting your major and now I see how much work I really have to do.”

 

Not only is “Meeting your Major” important to students, but so are the faculty members behind these classes and majors.

 

“Professors are available for the students,” business teacher and Director of Workforce and Economic Development Tom Morehouse said. “We do the best we can to help our students succeed and get out of Pierce.”

 

Morehouse introduced different plans of success to his students to help them understand their business career goals with a certificate, associate degree or the classes necessary to transfer to a California State University.

 

Teachers also demonstrate how to relate general education classes into major-related classes and how they all tie in with each other.

 

“The community college system is a great opportunity for students to experiment with several types of classes and figure out the ones they really want.” said Morehouse.

 

Both Cohen and Saldivar agree that the workshop was helpful and the teachers answered all the students questions, but it is up to one’s self to set those goals and accomplishments, and most important to be happy with the end results.

 

“Who would have thought it would be that difficult to figure out what you really want to do in life?” Saldivar said. “It’s all about what I am passionate about.”

 

For more information about upcoming workshops during the semester, contact the Career and Transfer Services Center at (818) 710- 4126 or through the Pierce College website.

David Schub
Staff Fall 2012

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