Home Opinion Column Mitch’s Pitches: Sit yo flag down

Mitch’s Pitches: Sit yo flag down

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Let me pitch you something: Colin Kaepernick and any other NFL player, can take a knee during the national anthem if they want — it is their First Amendment right as citizens of the United States. During the Baltimore riots in April, people were criticizing the people of Baltimore for their violent protests, calling for peaceful protests. Yet, Kaepernick is being treated like a criminal for giving them what they called for. The same people who I know, that are complaining about Kaepernick not standing during the national anthem are the same people who didn’t stand during the Pledge of Allegiance in high school.

I respect him and anyone else who has strong beliefs and is willing to stand up for their cause. Personally, I wouldn’t sit during the anthem, which is why I initially struggled to feel empathetic for the man who was doing something out of the norms of American society. However, as a Caucasian and Asian-American, I have never felt the grasps of marginalization that African Americans feel. Therefore, it would be ridiculous if I did not feel any type of empathy for him. Sitting during the national anthem of a professional football game has become highly controversial, thus, creating national debates and bringing awareness to his initial cause.

Critics feel Kaepernick simply hates America, and that “he should get out of the country,” or that “he should honor the military,” but that’s not his point.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” Kaepernick said to NFL media members.

Kaepernick stated that he has tremendous respect for the military, but believes they’re treated unjustly when they come back from their line of duty.   

Whether you agree or not, racism is still alive. He is taking a stand or rather, a knee by expressing himself he has created a ripple effect across the nation that has shined light upon a difficult subject. So Colin, take a knee if you want — it’s your right.