Prepare to pay more – if you’re a woman

Almost any woman can relate to spending money on beauty and health products, as well as for toys and games.

But those expenses are unfairly marked up for simply being gender-specific. It’s called the “Pink Tax.”

The prices for average products are raised when they are regarded as a female’s product.

The price difference between “normal” and women’s personal care products is 13%.

Girl toys are also being charged more just because they’re feminine. There is a 7% upcharge between toys meant for girls than those meant for boys.

In an article published by Huffpost, a girl’s Paw Patrol helmet was $25 while the exact same boy helmet was at $20.

According to Healthline.com, the origin of the pink tax is assumed to have originated from the capitalist idea of “if you can make from it, you should.” What isn’t considered is the gender discrimination that female-identifying people endure because of it.

Women who care about only having female products may feel weird buying products that are considered “male” or “normal.”

The high cost of female living can also impact women in college.

According to CNBC, the average student spends $1,200 with the average textbook price at $200. The unnecessary high-cost on “female only” products can cause female students to have to choose between feeling comfortable in their own skin and getting school supplies.

While one could argue that objects such as perfume and shaving cream aren’t necessities, the pink tax also plagues feminine hygiene products.

People with periods require menstrual products that are at a higher cost because of the “tampon tax.”

The tampon tax is the sales tax that is applied to menstrual products despite there being items that are exempt from taxes because they are considered “necessary” products—including the erectile dysfunction medication Viagra.

It wasn’t until recently that California exempted menstrual products and diapers from California’s state tax. The downside is that it will only be available for two years.

Women shouldn’t have to worry about the cost of feeling good in their skin or keeping themselves clean during their menstrual cycle.

Maintaining one of many capitalistic ideas does not justify gender discrimination.